Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Curve-billed thrasher (Toxostoma curvirostre), on saguaro (Carnegiea giganteum, top photo), and organ pipe cactus (Stenocereus thurberi, bottom). At the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, Arizona.

Please click either photo in the set for full views.

Cactus wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) on organ pipe cactus (Stenocereus thurberi). At the Desert Botanical Garden, Phoenix, Arizona.

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Tentatively Brewer’s sparrow (Spizella breweri) on organ pipe cactus (Stenocereus thurberi). At the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, Arizona. 
Please click to enlarge.

Tentatively Brewer’s sparrow (Spizella breweri) on organ pipe cactus (Stenocereus thurberi). At the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, Arizona. 

Please click to enlarge.

Lesser goldfinch (Carduelis psaltria), on whitebush verbena (Aloysia gratissima), at the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, Arizona.

Please click any photo in the set for enlarged views.

White-winged dove (Zenaida asiatica), feeding on saguaro cactus fruit (Carnegiea gigantea), at the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, Arizona.

Please click on either photo in the set for full views.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014
I’ll be taking a tumblr break for a few days while Thing 1 visits from Virginia. 
Here’s a rodeo cowboy ("My back!!!") and startled calf ("I don’t understand. What’s happening to me!?!") to mark your place until regular posts resume. 

I’ll be taking a tumblr break for a few days while Thing 1 visits from Virginia. 

Here’s a rodeo cowboy ("My back!!!") and startled calf ("I don’t understand. What’s happening to me!?!") to mark your place until regular posts resume. 

Sunday, July 13, 2014
Wolf’s milk slime mold (Lycogala epidendrum).
The fruiting bodies of this organism are sometimes mistaken for puffball mushrooms. The common name is thought to refer to the unpleasant, acrid fluids it produces. Yuck.
At Veit Spring Trail, on Agassiz Peak near Flagstaff, Arizona.

Wolf’s milk slime mold (Lycogala epidendrum).

The fruiting bodies of this organism are sometimes mistaken for puffball mushrooms. The common name is thought to refer to the unpleasant, acrid fluids it produces. Yuck.

At Veit Spring Trail, on Agassiz Peak near Flagstaff, Arizona.

Stemonitis sp. slime mold, Agassiz Peak, near Flagstaff, Arizona.
The colony of stalked sporangia on the left was about 1.5 cm in diameter. 

Stemonitis sp. slime mold, Agassiz Peak, near Flagstaff, Arizona.

The colony of stalked sporangia on the left was about 1.5 cm in diameter. 

Beard lichen (Usnea sp.) and unidentified fungus, at Veit Spring Trail on Agassiz Peak, near Flagstaff, Arizona. 
Daily monsoon rains arrived here in northern Arizona just over a week ago. The world is noticeably greener. All sorts of desiccated things are plumping up or emerging with startling suddenness. I can barely keep up with so much new and unfamiliar life. For instance, even a crude ID on the fungus in this photo has me stymied. Is is a polypore? A corticioid crust or patch fungus? Help me, please. I’ll be grateful!

Beard lichen (Usnea sp.) and unidentified fungus, at Veit Spring Trail on Agassiz Peak, near Flagstaff, Arizona. 

Daily monsoon rains arrived here in northern Arizona just over a week ago. The world is noticeably greener. All sorts of desiccated things are plumping up or emerging with startling suddenness. I can barely keep up with so much new and unfamiliar life. For instance, even a crude ID on the fungus in this photo has me stymied. Is is a polypore? A corticioid crust or patch fungus? Help me, please. I’ll be grateful!

Friday, July 11, 2014
Aspen Series, No. 3.
Dappled sunlight filtering through the aspen leaves creates perfect conditions for hairy bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum var. pubescens) in the understory. I will definitely be returning to this trail in the fall, when the dying fern smells like hay. 

Aspen Series, No. 3.

Dappled sunlight filtering through the aspen leaves creates perfect conditions for hairy bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum var. pubescens) in the understory. I will definitely be returning to this trail in the fall, when the dying fern smells like hay.