Thursday, October 16, 2014
Painted Sunrise, No. 8.
Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 8.

Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 7.
Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 7.

Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 6.
Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 6.

Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 5.
Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 5.

Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 4. 
Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 4. 

Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 3.
Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 3.

Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 2.
Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 2.

Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 1.
All of the photos in this series were taken in the Painted Desert unit of the Petrified Forest National Park, Navajo County, Arizona.
Please click for full view.

Painted Sunrise, No. 1.

All of the photos in this series were taken in the Painted Desert unit of the Petrified Forest National Park, Navajo County, Arizona.

Please click for full view.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), in the Painted Desert at dawn. Petrified Forest National Park, Navajo County, Arizona.

Please click either photo for enlarged views.

Bonus etymology: The species name hemionus is a direct transliteration of the Greek ἡμίονος, meaning half (hemi) and ass (onus) - the half-ass deer! 

Monday, October 13, 2014

Neon: Red Feather Lodge, Tusayan, Arizona.

A vintage mid-century relic of cultural mis-appropriation, for Indigenous Peoples’ Day.  

Sunday, October 12, 2014
Boston ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata), growing on the back fence.
I took this photo yesterday. Today all the leaves are gone, plucked and discarded by Flagstaff’s incessant wind. 

Boston ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata), growing on the back fence.

I took this photo yesterday. Today all the leaves are gone, plucked and discarded by Flagstaff’s incessant wind. 

Odds and Ends
Item: The post on Clark’s nutcracker should have noted that the bird gets its common name from explorer William Clark.
Item: Fellow explorer Meriwether Lewis is honored in the scientific appellation for bitterroot (Lewisia rediviva), the state flower of Montana.
Item: Sacagawea looks suspiciously European on this 1954 stamp.  
Item: I miss old-style perforated stamps, and the sweet sticky mucilage you would lick to affix them. Alas, progress. 

Odds and Ends

Item: The post on Clark’s nutcracker should have noted that the bird gets its common name from explorer William Clark.

Item: Fellow explorer Meriwether Lewis is honored in the scientific appellation for bitterroot (Lewisia rediviva), the state flower of Montana.

Item: Sacagawea looks suspiciously European on this 1954 stamp.  

Item: I miss old-style perforated stamps, and the sweet sticky mucilage you would lick to affix them. Alas, progress.