Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Flamingo Study No. 4.
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Flamingo Study No. 4.

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Flamingo Study No. 3.
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Flamingo Study No. 3.

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Flamingo Study No. 2.
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Flamingo Study No. 2.

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Flamingo Study No. 1.
All photos in this set were taken at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.
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Flamingo Study No. 1.

All photos in this set were taken at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

Please click photo for full view. 

Sunday, April 13, 2014
Epitaph: 1 HELL OF A MAN.
On a garage door in Barco, North Carolina.
Penciled inscriptions read: “For all the help you offered passers by with flat tires - Thanks / Donna and [Illegible] / You will be remembered 5/28/2011,” and “R.I.P. / J. B. and Gracie Davidson.” 
I think I would like to be remembered this way, with a spray can of day-glow paint and a hand-lettered memorial. 


Epitaph: 1 HELL OF A MAN.

On a garage door in Barco, North Carolina.

Penciled inscriptions read: “For all the help you offered passers by with flat tires - Thanks / Donna and [Illegible] / You will be remembered 5/28/2011,” and “R.I.P. / J. B. and Gracie Davidson.” 

I think I would like to be remembered this way, with a spray can of day-glow paint and a hand-lettered memorial. 

Saturday, April 12, 2014

The egret rookery in the Campostella Heights neighborhood in Norfolk, Virginia is not in trees on a quiet tidal inlet, but in a few loblolly pines on a major roadway, adjacent to homes, a school, a church. There is a even a McDonald’s restaurant nearby, at the crossroads shown in the bottom photo, just a few hundred feet from the rookery. The colony is only a few miles from the high-rise banks and businesses and hotels of downtown Norfolk. There is ample riparian and marshy habitat on the nearby Steamboat Creek, but to me the perplexing mystery of this egret colony is its choice of this unconventional location.  

Egret Series No. 7.
Great egret (Ardea alba), in Norfolk, Virginia.
Please click photo for enlarged view. 
I will be relocating soon to Arizona, where great egrets are migratory transients. I am excited in anticipation of my new environment, but I think I will be missing these majestic birds all too soon.

Egret Series No. 7.

Great egret (Ardea alba), in Norfolk, Virginia.

Please click photo for enlarged view. 

I will be relocating soon to Arizona, where great egrets are migratory transients. I am excited in anticipation of my new environment, but I think I will be missing these majestic birds all too soon.

Egret Series No. 5.
Great egret (Ardea alba), in Norfolk, Virginia.
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Egret Series No. 5.

Great egret (Ardea alba), in Norfolk, Virginia.

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Egret Series No. 4
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Egret Series No. 4

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Egret Series No. 3.
Great egret (Ardea alba), in Norfolk, Virginia. Male egrets are responsible for most nest construction. They will present building materials to their mates for approval before weaving them into their coarse nests. Finished nests will be up to three feet wide (90 cm) and a foot deep (30 cm).
This bird’s wings are almost fully extended - with a span of about 55 inches (140 cm).
Please click photo for full view.  

Egret Series No. 3.

Great egret (Ardea alba), in Norfolk, Virginia. Male egrets are responsible for most nest construction. They will present building materials to their mates for approval before weaving them into their coarse nests. Finished nests will be up to three feet wide (90 cm) and a foot deep (30 cm).

This bird’s wings are almost fully extended - with a span of about 55 inches (140 cm).

Please click photo for full view.  

Egret Series No. 2. Grooming.
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Egret Series No. 2. Grooming.

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